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 HERE IS MY "CEZANNE", NEVER RESEARCHED - why?
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jhomejimbo
Senior Member

720 Posts

Posted - Feb 23 2020 :  20:32:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a painting I bought it a very exclusive shop, fifty years ago, in Florida. I think I paid a good price for it, because I didn't care, back then.

I have never thought about whether it was actually painted by Cezanne - I have just loved it on my wall. Throughout the years, I have had. "Experts" look at many of my paintings, some were genuine, some were not. But, the irony is, that I have known many of the artist's whose paintings I have submitted, knowing that they are genuine, with provinance, - of course told that they were very good copies.

I, honestly, don't know if my "Cezanne" is genuine, or not. It, really, isn't important. It would be interesting, though, to hear your opinion about it. Maybe if I researched it, a bit, I might not have presented it to my friends on the "forum". I would probably be embarrassed.

In the past, there have been three paintings that I have presented for appraisal, and the experts (conoisseurs), couldn't commit themselves, one way or another. It was all based on their ability to turn it over for a great amount of money. Blagghh! The three paintings were supposedly by Sanzio Raphael, Martin Johnson Heade, and Daniel Zuloaga. I have been so frustrated with this. At 78, I'm certainly not going to be bothered by it. It would, just, be nice to know. My Raphael has been looked at, by Proffesor Alessandro Vezzosi, from Florence, Italy, an expert on Raphael - absolutely unable to remark on it, after spending an hour, with white gloves and magnifier. He, coincidentally, has a Raphael which he is touting. My Raphael is better than his! HAHA Allesandro is a very nice man, though.

Here are a few photos of my lovely Cezanne. Notice the amount of nails around the stretcher. I would love to see a site on the internet, showing the reverses of painter's works, just for art enthusiast's and collectors.

Thank, again, members,

Regards,
Jimmy N



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YAHOO
Junior Member

Italy
77 Posts

Posted - Feb 24 2020 :  03:15:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The photos are not in clear but my first opinion is that this is not a Cezanne.Looks like Cezanne but the brushtrokes of the painter are different.If you have another photo you will help me to have a clear opinion. (Sorry,i don't speak Enlgish well but i hope you understand me).
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jhomejimbo
Senior Member

720 Posts

Posted - Feb 24 2020 :  05:02:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you, "Yahoo". I will send better photographs. I appreciate your opinion, as always. And, your English is very understandable.

Thanks, again,

Regards,
Jimmy N
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YAHOO
Junior Member

Italy
77 Posts

Posted - Feb 24 2020 :  07:08:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would like to see the Raphael painting also,if you want.I like Raphael and i read a lot books about him.

Edited by - YAHOO on Feb 24 2020 07:09:21
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jhomejimbo
Senior Member

720 Posts

Posted - Feb 25 2020 :  00:06:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello Yahoo,

I submitted my "Self Portrait of Raphael", to the forum, on June 6, 2013 (you can refer to the post, using that date). In that case, (June 6, 2013), the assumption from the semi-weak photos, is that it is on oak. I think, very intently, that it is not. I have believed it is on poplar, and so have many others. The rest of the discussion, with the members, seemed to have been, because it was proportedly painted on oak, that it had to be 19th Century. I have tried to find a fair dendrocronologist over the years who could tell me the wood composition. I sent away for a dating test one time - they said that it could be anywhere from the 1400s to the 18th century. (A lot of good that did). I was also in touch with a young expert on Raphael. His name was Simon Nyazi, who had a wonderful blog about Raphael, called, "The Three Pipe Blog". We got to be good friends over the internet. He had been contacting other Raphael 'coneissuers, about the painting. He, unfortunately passed away, at 36 years old. I was so sad. He was incredibly brilliant about Raphael, and we became good friends, for months.
I'm back to square one. My wife and I, even, took it to an "Antiques Roadshow", just for
A chuckle. It wasn't the national video show. David McCarron and the painting experts told us, of course, with their limited facilities and lack of technical information, that it very well could be worth $1,000,000.00. I asked, if it were a copy, what would it be worth. They said, if it is, it is amazing, nevertheless. Of course, I am a realist, at my age, but you really have to see it in person. Alessandro Vezzosi was totally stumped! Ask him. It's fun to research, but maddening, at the same time. Yahoo, if I could reach you (internet, or phone), I'd love to hear from you.

Best Regards from Phoenix, Arizona,

Jimmy Ni.
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YAHOO
Junior Member

Italy
77 Posts

Posted - Feb 26 2020 :  02:31:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I saw your Raphael painting and i think it is no so high quality as a Raphael.It is a#957; after work but is a nice work and high value.At his self portrait, Raphael used Venetian school's colors but in your work the colors are different.I also see less touches with brush on the wood and Raphael used sketches with curves.However i think your painting has high quality because it is very old painting and in good condition. Can you give me please the Simon Nyazi blog? I am interested to read his articles.

Edited by - YAHOO on Feb 26 2020 02:34:37
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jhomejimbo
Senior Member

720 Posts

Posted - Mar 03 2020 :  21:05:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yahoo,
Here is a reference to Hasan Niyazi, and his blog.

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness.
John Keats”

Hasan retweeted this the day before his sudden death at the age of 37. Hasan, you – and your passion for beauty – are impossible to forget, too.

I return to my neglected blog space under the saddest of circumstances. Hasan was a mercurial force in the digital art history space, and created a devoted community of Renaissance art lovers around his blog Three Pipe Problem. In November 2011 he wrote proudly to me that Three Pipe Problem had surpassed 300,000 page views since its launch in late 2009. He was letting me know that my own guest post had received healthy traffic.

I was so moved and grateful that he had given me a voice in the art history space. Without his kind offer of a guest post I would have pretty much been talking to myself. He took an equal opportunities approach to his platform. He gave those who were willing to write with rigor and passion a voice, regardless of academic pedigree. He unearthed my obscure blog posts and started a dialogue with me through Twitter and then email.

With Hasan I felt I had found a kindred spirit, united by a love of art history. He understood what it meant to love Renaissance painting – to appreciate a specific beauty, utterly unique in the world. Sometimes when I feel discouraged, I can be lifted back to a state of wonder through this art. It’s not something easily shared in analog life. It felt so amazing to share it with Hasan and feel the same spark of recognition with his community. If that weren’t enough, he also loved cats and 3D animated art!

He was so disarming with his personal tweets and emails. Sometimes I felt closer to him than perhaps was strictly reality based, because I hadn’t really experienced a deep virtual friendship before. He kept me in the art loop with tweets and reference materials. Without this I would have been floating in outer art space. I loved too our light hearted exchanges about cats. I thought it was so wonderful that he hosted a birthday party for his cat complete with party hats.

The particular sadness I now feel is that I lost close touch with both the art history community and with Hasan over the past year due to a kind of virtual hibernation period I went through. I thought he’d be there when I returned. He was so understanding and encouraged me to get in touch whenever. I wish I had tweeted him more often from my dark cave, because I thought about him constantly.

I now understand he had this kind of effect on many kindred souls all over the world. I hope to remain a part of this community he created. On his site, he wrote this:

If reading one these posts leads you to look at a painting, watch a movie or a read a book you hadn’t before – that would be delightful!

I have looked at so many paintings with fresh eyes thanks to you, Hasan. For the rest of my life, when I look at the wondrous paintings I love, I’ll think of you.

Hasan Niyazi
Hasan Niyazi

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laurie van Dijk05. Nov, 2013 at 3:18 AM
You made me cry, and realize(once again) Just how precious people can be to us.. I just recently suffered the loss of both my fathers, and even though we knew it was coming… well we all feel the same in these situations. I feel your pain and am thinking of you.


glennisnet05. Nov, 2013 at 10:58 AM
Thanks Laurie. I’m sorry also for your loss. I’ll be thinking of you too.


Hasret12. Nov, 2013 at 1:21 PM
Thank you for sharing your beautiful memories of my dear brother, Hasan. I am his younger sister, Hasret and am so honoured by the tremendous admiration and respect Hasan has recieved from all over the world. I loved how you also added the stories about cats- that is very much him. My family is in deep shock and grieving for his sudden and unexpected passing. We take confort and thank you for posting such heartfelt tributes.


glennisnet28. Dec, 2013 at 11:27 AM
Hasret, I am so sorry for your loss. If you and your family have taken comfort from this tribute and others, I am very grateful.

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arb
Senior Member

Netherlands
803 Posts

Posted - Mar 07 2020 :  12:50:32  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Apart from Cézanne being out of this forum’s league, even this genius’s work consists of crusts of smeary stuff on linen fabric. Of which I have seen enough in my lifetime to know that this particular crust is considerably younger than 1906, the year Cézanne died. Whatever may have happened to it, from relining, cleaning to retouching and re- and devarnishing, the surface would have aged and altered differently. The paint does not seem to contain the pigments 19th century artists used. I think this was done after WW2.
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jhomejimbo
Senior Member

720 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2020 :  01:41:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, arb,

Because of the amount of nails around the stretcher, I thought, maybe, that would be a clue. I'm at a total loss, but, it just seemed curious to me - I don-t know any history.

Thank you, so much, for your input. Even if a painting's author might be beyond the scope of this forum, a great work might be seen to be spectacular, and start someone on a great voyage in art. It, truly, has happened to me. I have presented works, which looked promising, only to find that they were original, quality pieces of art. This forum is where I always begin my searches. There are some amazingly talented forum members, who, sometimes, has some great information concerning art. Some, not so informed, and some guessers. I accept and appreciate them all. I had a member tell me that they would have passed on a painting I presented, if they saw it in a thrift shop for $5.00. I sold it for $35,000. It's all in the eye, and the knowledge. You can't make a Cezanne, out of a "Smith".

Always great to hear from you!

Regards,

Jimmy N
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